Dogs and cats may become overweight for many reasons. Whether the obesity is due to simple overfeeding or a result of disease progression, your pet is taking in more calories than he is using. To prevent excess weight, we must feed our pets according to their activity level and age. In general, younger pets will need more calories per pound of body weight than older pets whose metabolisms have slowed.

Obesity in cats is very common and can predispose the cat to diabetes, Hepatic Lipidosis and arthritis. Overweight and actually obese cats out number cats of normal weight. Weight loss plans in cats needs to be approached very carefully.


Pet Foods
To meet your pet’s nutritional needs, we primarily carry two well-recognized pet food lines: Hill’s Prescription Diet and Medi-Cal. These diets are of excellent quality and provide complete and balanced nutrition for your pet. We will gladly special order other diets to meet your pet’s individual needs. If your pet has a special nutritional requirement, our doctors will recommend an appropriate diet to support the therapy of various illnesses, such as kidney disease, liver disease, gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, oral health care and urinary tract disease, among others.

We are able to recommend and access a variety of other veterinary diets. Please speak with your veterinarian if you are interested in changing your pet's diet, or have questions or concerns about your pet's food. To order your prerscription or food online: Order Prescriptions & Food Online


A Comment on Raw and Homemade Diets
Many pet owners report being satisfied with raw and homemade diets that they make themselves or purchase from retailers. On a raw diet, pets eat only raw meat such as chicken, beef, lamb, rabbit or whatever else might be available from the butcher. Homemade diets are more typically cooked and use combinations of meats and vegetables. Both are often marketed as ‘organic’ or ‘all natural’. Some pet owners and retailers suggest that these types of diets are better suited to animals’ digestive tract and may reduce the incidence of allergies and gastrointestinal problems. At this time there is no evidence to support these claims. In fact, raw and homemade diets can be just as problematic to a sensitive digestive system as many other commercially available foods. In addition, they can be expensive and time consuming to prepare. Some studies have found an increased risk of human exposure to illness-causing bacteria (such as salmonella and campylobacter) through the stools of pets that are fed raw diets. Speak to your veterinarian if you are considering introducing raw or homemade food to your pet’s diet.

Helpful Links
www.petdiets.com is endorsed by veterinarians and provides information and recipes for pet owners interested in preparing homemade food for their pets.